10 Pieces for a Cleaner World

10 PIECES FOR A CLEANER WORLD

Category: Beauty

Pitch

10 Pieces is a new environmental sustainable tourism initiative that encourages group tour travellers to pick up 10 pieces of litter per day on their overseas tour.

The initiative provides a segue between standard tours and voluntourism, enabling travellers to truly make a difference by simply picking up 10 pieces of litter – as travellers before them have done and travellers after them will continue to do.

Most travellers and tour companies currently follow the mantra of ‘Take only photographs, leave only footprints’, but 10 Pieces takes this one step further with its mantra of ‘Take only photographs and litter, leave only footprints’.

Critical Need

Developing countries are plagued by litter and the problems associated with it, ultimately endangering plant and animal life as well as our own. Often this is due to the local community littering, but more often than not it is due to inconsiderate tourists who exacerbate the problem.

10 Pieces will not only beautify the regions in which it is conducted, it will also set a good example for fellow travellers and the local community. Community engagement and education would follow.

Impact

10 Pieces benefits not only the local community by creating a cleaner environment, but also the travellers themselves who benefit from more beautiful surroundings and who feel like they are truly making a difference. Further, making a positive difference leads to travellers’ increased satisfaction with a tour (Holmes & Smith, 2009) and hence encourages repeat business for the tour company involved.

Success parameters will be converting 20% of G Adventures’ group tour travellers to conduct the ‘10 Pieces’ initiative at least once within the next three years.

The evidence to support the adoption of 10 Pieces is vast. For the final Capstone subject of my Master of Business in International Marketing, I researched the viability of launching the initiative. Extensive primary and secondary research was conducted. Primary exploratory research took the form of: focus groups with consumers (x2, 6 people each); one-on-one interviews with group tour companies (x7); one-on-one interviews with Clean Up Australia and Two Hands Project (x2); and an online survey with consumers (x1, 194 respondents).

Both travellers and tour companies alike were interested in implementing the initiative. The age group the most interested (neutral and above) was actually 18-24 year olds at 88%, followed by 25-34 year olds at 80%, 35-44 at 76% and 45-54 at 69%. Out of the 7 tour companies interviewed, all of them were interested in implementing 10 Pieces.

Tour companies and travellers’ main motivators are:

-litter perceptions
Travellers may be greatly affected by litter, yet they would only be motivated to pick it up depending on location, source, and connection. The locations that motivate travellers the most tend to be natural landscapes, particularly beaches, rivers, and hiking trails, or when it affects animals or children. Travellers are also more likely to pick up litter if its presence is due to other negligent tourists or other largely unavoidable circumstances. Further if they care about the spaces or if it resembles their home environment, they are more likely to be motivated e.g. people living on the coast tend to be more motivated by beaches.

-formalising an ingrained behaviour
Research revealed that the ‘10 Pieces’ initiative harnesses what people already do on their own but further legitimises their behaviour. Many travellers already pick up other people’s litter. “Wouldn’t you do that? I do that. If I’m on a bushwalk… and there’s garbage around… I’ll pick it up”, Christine, 36. Terrie-Ann Johnson, Clean Up Australia’s Chief Executive further believes ‘10 Pieces’ would be seen as a positive influence as it helps to justify to others why they are picking up litter (Johnson, 04/10/12).

-ease
Research findings supported that ease was one of the main reasons why travellers and tour companies alike would engage in the initiative. [It would be] “…very easy to incorporate into a tour” (Marketing Manager, a Global Adventure Group Tour Company, 24/10/12).

-making a difference
Research findings showed travellers and tour companies’ main ‘reward’ would be to see that the ‘10 Pieces’ initiative is actually making a difference. Thus the more travellers believe it is making a difference, the more motivated they will be and the more likely they will be to signing up to ‘10 Pieces’ for a second or future time.

-social approval
Individuals are more likely to exhibit behaviour if it results in valued outcomes (positive reinforcement) (Bandura, 1986 in Mazziotta et al., 2011: 258). Whilst ‘making a difference’ was the main outcome, research also suggested respondents would seek some form of social gratification or validation; “You want people to know”, Tori, 29. ‘10 Pieces’ could therefore potentially be seen as a way to leverage one’s social status by using it to display how an individual has picked up more litter or picked up litter in more locations than others.

-compatibility with community needs
A major prerogative for the travel industry is to develop initiatives that are beneficial for both travellers and the local communities they are visiting. In the case of ‘10 Pieces’, travellers could tailor their litter picking initiatives to suit the local communities given litter is typical to a destination e.g. collecting plastic whiskey sachets on Mount Cameroon.

Logistics was the number one concern of survey respondents (see report, Appendix 8.5, q.17) as well as tour companies. This was identified as an issue in terms of carrying, transporting and disposing of litter.

Carrying litter was identified as a problem for travellers, hence the solution proposed was to make litter collection and transportation easy for them. When travellers are hiking, for example, sherpas at the front, middle and back of a group could carry bags for disposal (a group tour Responsible Tourism Manager, 12/10/12). When I was travelling, I would often find discarded plastic bags as per the photo above and use it to carry the rubbish I collected. However, (branded) dry sacks would be a far superior option and could be used by each traveller for easy litter collection and subsequent re-use.

Companies were apprehensive about the space and potential smell whilst transporting litter, however, it was agreed that this could be largely overcome by picking up small and largely non-malodourous items such as cigarette butts when travelling through areas for extended periods of time without suitable litter disposal.

Litter disposal was nonetheless resoundingly identified as the largest concern. One group tour company was extremely concerned by this issue largely due to their past experiences with collecting and disposing of litter. In many destinations they frequent, waste disposal and recycling facilities are very basic and often litter is just moved from one site to another (a group tour Responsible Travel Manager, 17/09/12). For example, on past litter picking trips in Egypt, litter removed from the beach was dumped at a desert side and left to blow around the desert and when taking litter to a particular campsite, it was simply ‘chucked’ over the wall or burnt. Not only does this defeat the purpose of litter picking, going against the notion of ‘making a difference’, it can also prove to be worse for the environment. “…it’s not good to leave the plastic bags lying around but is burning them even worse?” (a group tour Responsible Travel Manager, 02/10/12). Potential solutions identified were encouraging tour leaders, operations managers or locals who know the area well to identify suitable litter disposal locations and/or to develop waste disposal facilities.

'10 Pieces’ capitalises on the latest trends whereby:

-There is a growing interest in sustainable tourism and voluntourism (CMIGreen in Planeterra Foundation, 25/10/12) and associated Corporate Social Responsibility (Scott, 2007: 7) - driving the relevance of the initiative

-Consumers are striving for sustainable consumption and becoming increasingly sceptical of companies with ‘half-hearted eco initiatives’; every aspect of the product or service must be sustainable (Super Eco) (Trendwatching, 30/08/12) - driving the sincerity of the initiative

-Soon the only way to stand out in the eco sphere will be to be over generous; ‘cleaning up not only your own mess but someone else’s too’ (Eco Boosters) (Trendwatching, 30/08/12) - driving the core of the initiative

-Companies are increasingly making it easier for consumers to do the right thing (Eco Easy) (Trendwatching, 30/08/12) - driving the simplicity and ease of the initiative

-Friends, families and followers are greatly influencing consumers’ purchasing decisions (The F-Factor) (Trendwatching, 30/08/12) and consumers are looking for diverse ways to get their status fix (Statusphere) “As consumers are starting to recognise and respect fellow consumers who stray off the beaten consuming-more-than-thou-path, ‘new’ status can be about acquired skills, about eco-credentials, about generosity, about connectivity...” (Trendwatching, 30/08/12) - driving the social element of the initiative

And lastly, to throw some theory in here, the Diffusion of Innovation theory states an innovation’s adoption rate varies predominantly by: relative advantage (perceived as superior); compatibility (consistency with values), complexity (difficulty in understanding and use), trialability (degree to which the innovation can be experimented with); and observability (visibility of effects); of which the first two factors are the most important (Ozaki & Dodgson, December 2010: 314). ‘10 Pieces’ has: a high relative advantage due to its greater convenience, social prestige and satisfaction; high compatibility with existing norms, values and practices; a high degree of simplicity; a high degree of trialability; and highly observable results both on the day within the team and through post-tour updates. This thus equates with a fast rate of adoption. Moreover, Rogers believes once 10-25% of the population adopt an innovation, there is a relatively rapid adoption by the rest of the population (Rogers, 2003 in Ozaki & Dodgson, December 2010: 314) also known as the ‘tipping point’ commencing with innovators and early adopters and moving into the early majority. Once ‘10 Pieces’ attracts an initial following, it should perpetually increase in popularity.

For additional evidence, please request a copy of my 83 page report assessing 10 Pieces’ viability.

Feasibility

10 Pieces has a recommended development period of 12 weeks: 2 weeks to investigate opportunities within G Adventures’ existing tour portfolio; 4 weeks to manage the integration into each tour and 6 weeks to manage 10 Pieces’ marketing materials for tour information packs. Further there would be ongoing program management to ensure success and post-trip evaluation with tour leader and participants.

The projected costs involved are:
-website including eCommerce development and algorithm to track litter collected $10,000
-10 Pieces’ marketing materials* $5,000
-litter picking and disposal materials $2,500
-10 Pieces merchandise initial order $2,500
-10 Pieces’ fulfillment $5,000

*Includes development of virtual badges for use on travellers’ social networks to display the amount of litter they have collected per continent

(future funding will be put towards developing an app showing heavily littered locations and the nearest and best disposal options)

Overseas litter picking initiatives to date have been met with varying degrees of success. Existing initiatives typically involve a large effort, appeal to a narrow target market, occur infrequently and cover a limited range of geographical areas. Perhaps the most successful of these initiatives is Clean Up the World (CUW) which Clean Up Australia (CUA) purports is ‘one of the largest community-based environmental campaigns in the world’ (CUW, 20/08/12). In spite of its success, however, it only occurs once a year. For the rest of the year, litter continues to accumulate and interest in litter picking wanes. Other global litter picking initiatives appear to be conducted on an independent basis. For example ‘Two Hands Project’ which encourages people to take 30 minutes to pick up litter (using their two hands) – anytime, anywhere in the world (Two Hands Project, 30/08/12) and ‘Take 3’ which encourages people worldwide to take three pieces of litter from a beach, waterway or anywhere with them when they leave (Take 3, 20/08/12).

There exists thus a gap in the market as when compared with existing overseas litter picking initiatives, ‘10 Pieces’ would not only increase the frequency with which litter would be removed, but also cover a wider geographical area and engage a broader audience due the initiative’s inherent simplicity.

A tour company’s partners could also become involved in the initiative over time e.g. scuba diving companies that encourage their divers to collect 10 pieces of litter before, after or on their dive.

10 Pieces could also ultimately be included in our daily lives even when we’re at home, beautifying our own surroundings.

Last Points

10 Pieces is yet to be implemented in the market, hence first mover advantage will be significant for any company desiring to be perceived as the leading sustainable group tour provider.

A detailed 83 page report assessing 10 Pieces’ viability is available upon request, as is a proposal summarising all key findings.

Further, having recently spent 11 months in Africa successfully implementing this initiative, I am extremely passionate about it and believe it has potential.

For lighter reading about my 10 Pieces journey, see my blog entries here:
http://10piecescleaner.blogspot.com.au/2011/07/10-pieces-pledge.html
http://10piecescleaner.blogspot.com.au/2011/12/essaouira.html
http://10piecescleaner.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/climbing-up-and-skiing-down-mount.html
http://10piecescleaner.blogspot.com.au/2012/04/10-pieces-update.html

Finally, a huge thank you to everyone who has taken the time to vote and comment on my idea so far. I have included your feedback where possible into my submission so please keep voting and commenting to help make this idea a reality!

629 votes 62 comments 14502 views
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439.5 Highest pulse:
712.5 on Apr 6, 2013
Voting Now Closed
Submitted by:

Lisa Vitaris

Location:

Sydney, Australia

Comment on this idea

Comments Closed
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks Roger & Jessica. Fingers' crossed! I just went on a quick trip to Beijing (a very clean city complete with street sweepers on almost every corner) and found that The Great Wall was actually a perfect location to pick up (other travellers') litter. There really are so many opportunities where this initiative could be implemented. I'm going to do my best to launch it one way or another! :) Thanks for your support! 06:06AM May 31, 2013
Jessica Kerr Jessica Kerr
United States
Lisa, love, love, love this idea. Good luck. Hope your idea makes the cut! 06:53PM May 30, 2013
roger groome roger groome
United Kingdom
Great idea. A hgh task keeping litter in check in third world countries. Lisa the screen on this site moves like a fruit machine roller when i type this comment on my samsung phone. 05:48PM May 26, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Chuck, I completely agree. This is just an initial step in trying to tackle quite a large litter problem. Education and community engagement should definitely be considered as part of the future plan. In my research, I came across a really good example of just that. One tour leader of an adventure group tour company would always get their travellers to pick up litter on a certain beach in Bali. One time, however, there was no litter and the tour leader found out the locals had started cleaning the beach themselves due to the example that was set by the flow of travellers coupled with their pride in their surroundings. Overall, each location selected for 10 Pieces should be examined on a case-by-case basis and how to educate and engage the local community should form a significant part of this. Thanks for your suggestion. 04:29AM May 22, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks Katka - appreciate you spreading the word. And you're right about it taking the same time and effort as choosing 10 postcards - nice analogy! Lisa 04:17AM May 22, 2013
Chuck Taylor Chuck Taylor
Canada
Love all the idea in terms of all points you make! The only issue I see is that it's foreigners picking up trash — so there's no educational or preventative component in order to change local policies or behaviours. I recommend a local educational element to round out this otherwise excellent idea! 08:41PM May 21, 2013
Katka Lapelosa Katka Lapelosa
United States
Your G Project was mentioned in my latest article on Matador Network, the largest independent online travel magazine. Good luck! http://matadornetwork.com/change/10-g-projects-that-are-going-to-change-the-world/ 11:26AM May 21, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Ruth, thanks for your comment - litter disposal is by far the trickiest part of the whole initiative and both travellers and tour companies alike share your concerns as nothing would be more demotivating or pointless than knowing that the effort you put in (albeit small) was in vain. My idea is to talk with the local tour leaders and community to determine the best possible disposal options within an area and share these worldwide locations via an App. If there aren't any suitable options, then we would need to work out a suitable solution for the area for example, do you transport the 10 pieces of litter everyone picks up until you can find a suitable disposal option (evidently focusing on small pieces of litter)? Or do you create disposal facilities yourself? (this is being done in Nepal as I understand it). Or do you focus on other areas that do have suitable disposal options? A very good question and one that needs more thinking through for each location selected. Cheers, Lisa 05:51AM May 21, 2013
Ruth Caldwell Ruth Caldwell
Australia
Good start - but where would you put the 10 pieces of rubbish in tourist areas that don't have proper waste disposal methods? My experience of many remote tourist destinations is that waste isn't collected efficiently because there's nowhere or no way to dispose of the rubbish once it's all together. You end up then having large unofficial 'dumps' all around the place. 09:31PM May 19, 2013
dominic phelan dominic phelan
Australia
Hey Lisa, Really cool to see how you have developed your concept since trialling it through West Africa. It was a good idea then, now with the solid marketing work it's a cracker. One way or another it'll get up. Cheers Dom 09:26AM May 17, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks for the support everyone! Linda - yes a litter picker is a good option for those who do not want to touch the rubbish. Thanks for commenting. 11:02PM May 14, 2013
Linda Fleming Linda Fleming
Canada
We use the same device that wheelchair bound people use to reach things off higher heights, but you clamp the garbage and put the garbage into a bag. That way, you don't have to touch the garbage. 04:02PM May 14, 2013
claude drulik claude drulik
Australia
Lisa - wishing you every success. Looks like a great venture. 03:41AM May 12, 2013
Kim Kennett Kim Kennett
Canada
A very simple, but interesting idea, Lisa! Good luck! 02:47PM May 08, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks for those stats Kathryn - they're really compelling. There is without a doubt a huge need for more sustainable tourism initiatives - particularly in the adventure travel sector. Appreciate your continued interest. Cheers 06:57AM May 03, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Rob, what a great suggestion. For the people who don't want to touch rubbish, perhaps a "litter picker" could be an option but for those who don't want to go anywhere near it, agree that a 'litter offset' could be a good idea. It's my understanding that carbon offsetting hasn't really taken off but I would be interested in doing more research around your idea. Thanks for your thoughts :) 06:52AM May 03, 2013
Kathryn St Jean Kathryn St Jean
Canada
A 2012 report by The Travel Foundation and Forum for the Future states, “Today’s consumers expect travel companies to build sustainability into their product offer. A majority (70%) believe companies should be committed to preserving the natural environment and 55% want fair working conditions, while three quarters want a more responsible holiday and 66% would like to be able to easily identify a greener holiday.” In addition, “84% of those working in marketing & PR management see green credentials becoming increasingly important as environmental issues move to the forefront of customers’ minds. 10:41PM May 02, 2013
Rob Lundie Rob Lundie
Australia
Great idea, Lisa. However, I suspect many people who support the idea just don't want to touch rubbish, with or without gloves. Could they be encouraged to pay a 'litter offset' charge just as we do a 'carbon offset' charge when we fly? Maybe the travel companies could offer this as an option. The money raised could go towards providing collection bags to travellers, promoting your idea, locating/building suitable rubbish disposal sites in local areas, etc. Just a thought. Rob 10:04PM May 02, 2013
Scott Nargar Scott Nargar
Australia
No problems Lisa, Keep up the great work 12:04AM April 30, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Scott, thanks for your sustained interest in 10 Pieces. I think your idea of using a dry sack to carry the rubbish is a brilliant solution. No mess and easy to carry, plus they can also be easily cleaned and ready to use a second or future time. Oh and they could be branded with 10 Pieces as well as any potential sponsor that might want to come on board. Appreciate your input :) Lisa 03:28AM April 29, 2013
Scott Nargar Scott Nargar
Australia
Hi Lisa, big fan of the idea. Have you considered a method of storing the rubbish? I used a 2 litre dry sack when I trekked Kokoda in PNG. The water proof sack becomes air tight when closed, it’s a great way of keeping the rubbish secure especially if there is still some food or liquid reside evident. The dry sacks can easily be clipped on the outside of a back pack until you reach your final destination. The cost is about $12 AUD for a 2 litre sack. 07:04PM April 28, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks Susan - yes I agree that picking up litter sets a good example for onlookers, whether they be encouraged to do the same thing or simply cut down/stop littering themselves. 06:24PM April 27, 2013
Melissa Ford Melissa Ford
Australia
Such a great idea Lisa! You have my vote that is for sure. I hope that this idea really takes off because I'm sure it will make a big difference. All the best with the competition. 04:25AM April 26, 2013
susan edwards susan edwards
Canada
great idea lisa. i have been on several litter pick-ups here at home and it is very satisfying to have a small army of volunteers cleaning things up. we are given gloves and a container for our litter and then empty into a central place at the starting point. when doing this we hoped the people in the neighbourhood would get the idea. i have always been someone who picks things up and am amazed at how many people just drop things anywhere. and good research. susan e. 12:41PM April 21, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks again to all of you for your comments - I have incorporated some more points in my entry. Daniel - when I conducted my research, I was basing the idea on the Australian-based adventure overseas group tour market (as a launch strategy) which is evidently only a fraction of the global market. I would love to find out how many adventure group tour travellers are out there globally. I'm sure it's significant and growing as your stats suggest. 12:42AM April 20, 2013
Keith Mirgis Keith Mirgis
Australia
@danielsendecki Interesring stats my friend and I am interested to know where you got them from, specifically about the 50% of travellers being adventure ones. Do you have a link? 05:00PM April 18, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks for the continued interest in my idea Daniel. That is a great statistic - it suggests there's a huge potential for this! I can't wait to implement it - ideally through this competition! 06:16AM April 17, 2013
Daniel Sendecki Daniel Sendecki
Canada
Hey Lisa—revisiting your idea again today and appreciate your insight in the comment stream here! Reading online, I discovered that the global market for 'adventure travel' is valued at $89b. At its current pace what we refer to as 'adventure travel' today could be 50% of all reasons to travel by 2050. That's an amazing potential resource with a vested interest in making our world a better place! 12:10AM April 17, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Meret, you raise a point that I struggled with the most when researching this project as part of my Masters and that group tour companies and travellers alike resoundingly identified as their largest concern too. Good question! Often waste disposal and recycling facilities are very basic or non-existent and litter can simply be moved from one place to another. My research revealed that a particular group tour company had implemented a litter collecting activity in one country, however, travellers soon found out the litter they collected ended up being disposed of in the desert where it simply blew around which is extremely demotivating not to mention a waste of time. My suggestion is to have the tour leaders, operations managers or locals identify the best litter disposal options in the particular area the litter collection is being conducted. Should budget permit, I plan to develop an app that could be used to show good places to collect litter as well as their nearest and best disposal options. Further, if litter is collected in an area with poor disposal options, it could potentially be transported to the next destination where the options may be better (evidently travellers would need to adapt the type of litter they collect in this instance to small items that are not malodorous.) Thanks for raising this - it's an extremely important consideration for this initiative. 08:48AM April 16, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Dave, thanks for your comment. Take 3 is a fantastic initiative indeed. In my report I have examined the initiative as well as Two Hands Project. Two Hands' focus is about time-based clean-ups (30 mins) again with a focus on plastic - it too is a great initiative. What 10 Pieces aims to do is similar in terms of the ease proposition, however, due to its link with group tour companies, it aims to engage a broader audience across a larger geographical area. Funnily enough I interviewed Paul Sharp, President and Co-Founder of Two Hands Project who believed a lot could be gained from pooling our passion for litter removal and resources. It could definitely be an option. Cheers :) 08:27AM April 16, 2013
Dave Bolton Dave Bolton
Australia
Great idea! So you know...in response to beach pollution, the "Take 3" initiative was born...check out: www.take3.org.au "Take 3" is a not-for-profit organisation formed in 2009 that aims to raise awareness of marine debris by encouraging each visitor to the beach, waterway or...anywhere to simply take 3 pieces of rubbish with them when they leave. Take 3 also encourage everyone to reduce their unnecessary plastic consumption - and make our lives a little less plastic! 12:48AM April 16, 2013
Lois Baillie Lois Baillie
New Zealand
Easy to implement, anywhere, any time, hugely worthwhile idea. The rubber gloves and bag are essential, everyone should have them in their pocket. Go Lisa! 09:03PM April 15, 2013
Meret Schueschke Meret Schueschke
Germany
great feasible idea, just one point of clarification: Where would this litter be disposed of? In the country where it was picked up, or the traveler's home (I am asking this as a person who currently lives in an overseas country which does not have an effective waste disposal system) 03:50PM April 15, 2013
P.R.  Montgomery P.R. Montgomery
Canada
Fantastic idea! Being a travel based idea im drawn to this...I'll do it wherever I travel! I hope people adopt this easy and brilliant concept. All the best with the competition! 10:46AM April 14, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks to everyone who has voted and commented so far. Based on your feedback, I have improved my entry. Keep commenting to bring 10 Pieces to group tour companies' itineraries! 12:03AM April 14, 2013
Jackie Bennett Jackie Bennett
Australia
Terrific idea Lisa! 01:19AM April 11, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Hi Anna, yes in my research it appeared that travellers were actually more motivated to pick up litter if they knew it came from other tourists interestingly. It's a great idea to have travellers pick up their 10 pieces in areas next to their lodging as one example as the whole idea is about ease. Thanks for your feedback :) 04:05AM April 10, 2013
Anna Kamenskaya Anna Kamenskaya
Canada
While on vacation at an all-inclusive resort in Mexico, I have noticed large amounts of litter in the areas adjacent to the well-kept resort. I hope this initiative will provide an impact for cleaning such areas which are directly affected by tourists and are easily accessible by them. 06:13PM April 09, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks Kathryn. Yes great idea! I had thought to make social media a major part of this with people collecting virtual tokens/badges/points for the total amount of rubbish they pick up on a tour and listed per country they do it in so it can become a little competitive and be shared with friends. The only question is how to validate the amount of rubbish someone picks up - is it a trust based system? Or does the tour leader need to validate it? Or would it be based on the tour i.e. 15 days x 10 pieces per day = 150 pieces? Ideally the number of pieces collected could be uploaded to the 10 Pieces website so you could see the total tally as well as a breakdown per location/country. You've also got me thinking there should also be some reward for those who have picked up the most - perhaps points that go towards some free merchandise or discount on their next group tour or...? 05:08PM April 09, 2013
Kathryn St Jean Kathryn St Jean
Canada
You should call this idea "Ten Easy Pieces"! With an online presence and a community behind you, you should really consider "gamifying" the experience. Emerging data suggests that “gamification” provides a solution to accelerating sustainability. For example, let people track the amount (number of pieces) of waste they collect while travelling. People play games because of the fundamental need to get challenged, be social and achieve recognition. The motivation is largely emotional while the action is social; it involves the community. The reward is recognition; it signals leaders. Good luck, Lisa! 08:27AM April 09, 2013
Robin Yazbeck Robin Yazbeck
Australia
Love it! Feels like one of those concepts that has the potential to go viral. Best of luck with it Lisa 08:01AM April 09, 2013
Amylee Silva Amylee Silva
United Kingdom
Would love to this simple, yet powerful idea spread across the globe. 07:37AM April 09, 2013
Tina Vitaris Tina Vitaris
Australia
Well researched, great idea : simple and definitely achievable 12:07AM April 09, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks again all. Yes I know Daniel - and glad to have your support :) Good work on doing your bit for the environment! 09:49PM April 08, 2013
Laura Vaughan Laura Vaughan
Australia
This is such a great idea. It takes only a moment to make a impact on our earth by helping to keep it clean. I will be sure to participate in the future - Go Lisa!! 08:36PM April 08, 2013
Jason Kelly Jason Kelly
Australia
Nice one Lisa. Litter is a major issue in developing countries and this is a step in the right direction. Collect & Contribute. 07:43PM April 08, 2013
Marianna Idas Marianna Idas
Australia
I hope this works out as it sounds like a fantastic idea. Good luck. 07:36PM April 08, 2013
Daniel Coleman Daniel Coleman
New Zealand
I stole this idea from you before Lisa, I collect 5 pieces in between shop visits. Even better when I dispose of them inside the store, makes a great conversation starting point. All the best! 06:20PM April 08, 2013
Linda Randell Linda Randell
Australia
Great Idea... 05:59PM April 08, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks all for your support so far! I would also love to see 10 Pieces as a standard feature on all tours Chelsea :) 05:43AM April 08, 2013
tenille hunt tenille hunt
Australia
Brilliant idea - I love it! Good Luck :) 03:05AM April 08, 2013
sabrina Tande sabrina Tande
Australia
You've got my vote :) Your concept has all the ingredients to be successful: Simple / Practical / Impactful. Likewise, hoping to see more tour operators endorsing your idea! 02:42AM April 08, 2013
Chelsea Kappeler Chelsea Kappeler
Australia
What an awesome idea! Would love to see G take the initiative and introduce "10 Pieces" as a standard feature on all tours. 11:32PM April 07, 2013
Jolene Brown Jolene Brown
Australia
What a great idea - so simple and do-able! You have my vote - good luck, Lisa:) 11:01PM April 07, 2013
Natalie Whiston Natalie Whiston
Australia
I still love this idea Lisa and so glad that you submitted it to G Project. I've voted for you - all the best! 07:29PM April 07, 2013
Stewart P Stewart P
Australia
I think this idea is great, it's something we're all used to doing at home with great NGO initiatives like clean up Australia day. If a country is beautiful enough to visit, we should ensure it stays that way for others to enjoy. 07:03PM April 07, 2013
Scott Nargar Scott Nargar
Australia
I fully support this idea. As I treck in remote parts of the world it is sad to see more and more rubbish being left by previous trekkers. Its time we take a little more rubbish out than we take in. Great idea, good luck. 06:31PM April 07, 2013
Suzanna Divine Suzanna Divine
United Kingdom
Great idea Lisa! So easy to do, well done :-) 05:48AM April 07, 2013
Keith Mirgis Keith Mirgis
Australia
I can see how this could easily be incorporated into tours as a great way to clean up those over trodden trails. Great proof point for tour companies who pride themselves on sustainability as well. 09:54PM April 06, 2013
Lisa Vitaris Lisa Vitaris
Australia
Thanks Daniel :) I think it can really catch on. I see the idea starting with tour groups and then moving on to include individual travellers as well - and if it really takes off, perhaps even all people in their daily lives. 08:59PM April 06, 2013
Daniel Sendecki Daniel Sendecki
Canada
Wow, Lisa. Love the idea of leveraging tour operators to do this kind of thing. It's like crowdsourcing a local litter pickup day on a global scale. Voted. 07:51PM April 06, 2013
Jen Ki Jen Ki
Australia
Amazing idea! 04:56PM April 06, 2013